Local organizations give back to Hurricane victims; learn how you can donate

JACKSON, Tenn. — People here in West Tennessee are living up to the name “Volunteer State,” organizing donation drives to give to those affected by Hurricane Harvey.

“I can’t imagine. I can’t imagine what they are going through,” Elyse Bell with the United Methodist Church said.

People across the state are reaching out to those affected by the hurricane.

 

“I got a call from one of our guys, Tim, and he said they want to make a trip down. ‘What do you think?’ And I said, ‘let’s do it,'” SoulQuest Church Pastor Ronnie Coleman said. “We will use our church trailers and pack the thing out.”

SoulQuest Church is teaming up with the Salvation Army to donate supplies.

“They’re going to be headed out early in the morning to head down to drop off some supplies,” Coleman said.

They need your help. But before you give, there’s something you should know.

“People automatically assume bottled water, but they told us that is not their greatest need right now,” Coleman said.

They say they need personal hygiene items and easy-to-open food items that don’t need to be cooked.

“We’re going to be at the STAR Center parking lot tonight [Thursday] between 6:30 and 7:30, and we are just going to pack the trailer then,” Coleman said.

They aren’t the only ones giving back.

“One of the main things we do is clean up after a disaster, and we take teams in that clean up and rebuild houses,” Bell said.

The United Methodist Church needs your help as well.

“Dishwashing liquid or a clothes line they can hang out their clothes to dry or gloves so they don’t cut their hands,” Bell said.

They are packing a tractor-trailer to send to the victims.

If you want to donate, you can get a five-gallon bucket and fill it with supplies or you can buy the supplies and donate it and they will fill the bucket for you.

“The deadline to send items to this office is Sept. 11, at noon,” Bell said.

Both organizations say they are going outside the box to give back.

“We tell our people we don’t want to go to church — we want to be the church,” Coleman said.