Tools

West Tennesseans Remember 2012

By Natalie Potts
By npotts@wbbjtv.com

JACKSON, Tenn. - One of our top stories in 2012 in the Hub City was the rise in violent crimes. From murders to aggravated assaults, the numbers have gone up in most every city in West Tennessee.

WBBJ 7 Eyewitness News asked West Tennesseans how they will remember 2012 and what their hopes are in the new year 2013.

With 13 murders, countless unsolved shootings into homes this past year - it has been a tough year for many in Jackson.

We have seen residents fight back, marching through the streets of East Jackson chanting "Stop the Violence" in November.

Residents remember city leaders increasing enforcement, sweeping the streets, and promising they would take a stand against violence.

Madison County Sheriff David Woolfork told residents back in November that he would do everything he could to bring change.

"I can tell you this, Chief Gil Kendrick and I are going to take this city back, and I think we can do it. With your help, it will be a success, " said Sheriff Woolfork.

West Tennesseans told WBBJ 7 Eyewitness News that they are hopeful, because the new year brings new beginnings.

"With it being a new year, we can start over and try to make it a lot better place than it has been in the last year," said resident Charles Harris. "I just hope this year we can try and figure some things out and work together as a community."

Some residents said they would like the city to make a New Year's resolution to help others.

"Bringing in the homeless and getting these people off the streets that commit these crimes," said resident Julie Martin.

Most everyone agreed that people should work together to make 2013 count.

"It will take everyone. We need to try and make Jackson better and get it back to the way it used to be, a safe place for everybody," said Harris.

Compared to last year, Jackson officials said 2012 saw an increase in violent crimes by nearly 59 percent. Homicides went up by 160 percent and aggravated assaults increased by 70 percent.

Residents said they hope those numbers drastically decrease in the new year.

This content requires the latest Adobe Flash Player and a browser with JavaScript enabled. Click here for a free download of the latest Adobe Flash Player.