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Residents Take to Social Media to Save the Bemis Mill

By Brittany Nicholson
By bnicholson@wbbjtv.com

SOUTH JACKSON, Tenn. -- Residents in Bemis are speaking out on social media and joining together in support of the town's landmark: the Old Bemis Mill.

Richard Mullikin has lived in Bemis his entire life and said many things have changed there in his lifetime. But the Old Bemis Mill has remained the same.

"The Liberty Bell doesn't affect everybody's lives every day but they didn't just throw it out when it got cracked. It still means something to people," Mullikin, a resident of Bemis and creator of the "Save the Bemis Mill" Facebook page, said.

"I can't remember a time it hadn't been there. Just looking out my back door and not seeing it there would be a little odd," he explained.

That is why he created the "Save the Bemis Mill" Facebook page, where locals have joined together to show their support of the old cotton mill.

"I wanted to do something that showed support for everybody in this city that could get together and say hey, we're one city. We're still very supportive. We love our city, we love our history here and we don't want to see something taken away that could be here for hundreds more years," Mullikin said.

Some residents say the mill is not just a building, but a reminder of how the community came together.

Mullikin said if it were not for the Mill, he would have never met his wife.

"My wife's family moved from Mississippi for work, and without that mill my wife's mother would've never met her father. She would've never been born," he explained.

He said he hopes the city can hold onto the Old Bemis Mill for a while longer, but he also wants the Facebook page to remind West Tennessee about the history behind it.

"I really hope if nothing else, we can show people we are united. We are more of a city that's gonna come together. We're not just some people who live out here by a big building. We are a part of a big family and a people known as Bemis," Mullikin said.

The "Save the Bemis Mill" page was created Thursday night and had more than 300 members in less than 24 hours.

Mullikin said everyone is welcome to join the group.